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Misconceptions about Petticoating
#1
There is really a lot of misconceptions about petticoating. First this is an old practice that has been around for centuries back in the 1800’s up and until 1950’s petticoating was more main stream and mothers and teachers used it often to deal with unruly boys. During this time period is was still common for boys to wear dresses as babies and toddlers. Petticoating was never about dressing the boy as a girl, it was about returning him to the status of a baby or toddler. If a boy continued to act up he would find himself petticoated for extend period of time, until mommy was satisfied that he learned to behave like a big boy and not a baby.

In modern times petticoating gets a bad rap because the idea of dressing a boy like a girl scares people because it’s foreign to them to see a boy wearing a dress. The reality is most modern girl clothes are not that feminine and making a boy wear a denim skirt or leggings while cute is hardily petticoating and have you seen what most boys wear, long loose shorts that are pretty much culottes. Remember too that up until the 1950’s it was common to dress boys in lord Fauntleroy suits, Eton suits and other outfits that by today’s definition are girls clothes. The most successful petticoating is when the boy is dressed in old fashion ultra-frilly dresses, petticoats, and other prissy clothing. Most modern girls would throw a fit just as bad or worse over having to wear these types of prissy clothing.

Gender roles have greatly changed over the last 40 years and will continue to evolve as females take on a larger role and hopefully led us to a complete female control society. As these changes happen girls started to dress more like boys, play sports and stop wearing traditional feminine clothing (Frilly Dresses and Petticoats). For a long time, boy’s clothes did not really change or become more feminine. This is starting to change as pink is again an acceptable color for boys, boys jeans are starting to become more feminine and its common for boys to wear earrings and have long hair. On the surface these just appear as fashion trends, the reality is society has changed and femininity in boys is starting to become acceptable and even celebrated. Look how rapidly things have changed over the last decade, there are now girls sports teams that are competing and beating boys teams, schools/clubs are now having beauty pageants for boys (where the boys dress up in feminine dresses), in some schools these are now yearly events that have replaced the old girls beauty pageants, books and movies are promoting dresses for boys, go to any pre-school on Halloween and there are just as many boys dressed as Frozen Princesses as there are girls, these are plenty of other examples including the growing acceptance of the LGBT community. I firmly believe these changes are the start of lasting revolution that will lead to petticoating becoming main stream. Who knows maybe I just dreaming, IMHO within twenty years dresses and other prissy clothing will be common place for boys while jeans and t-shirts will be consider girl clothes and rarely worn by boys.

RF
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#2
Some really interesting thoughts here.

Whilst I completely agree that there has been a substantial change in gender roles, I think it is a little one sided. Girls are definitely doing more in relation to traditional male activities either in the workplace or sports etc. but I don't think it is reciprocated on the male side - at least not to the same degree. The liberal media would have you think that here are thousands of house husbands doing the things that women used to do e.g. looking after the house, childcare etc. but personally I don't think this is the norm and there is plenty of old fashioned thinking still out there.

On the subject of clothes I think there has been a big growth in gender neutral type clothing and boys wearing more feminine attire when they are younger. No one would probably think twice about seeing a young boy in a dress now or girlish leggings etc. However, this still tends to stop around school age and peer pressure kicks in so whether they (or their parents) want to there tends to be a gradual move towards boys clothes and getting hair cut short. It doesn't happen in all cases, but these tend to be focused on transgender children or youngsters that are not in a mainstream environment.

Perhaps it is heading in the direction you want - but I think there is still a long way to go.

Sissy Matthew
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#3
(11-21-2016, 01:05 PM)RadicalFeminist Wrote: There is really a lot of misconceptions about petticoating. First this is an old practice that has been around for centuries back in the 1800’s up and until 1950’s petticoating was more main stream and mothers and teachers used it often to deal with unruly boys. During this time period is was still common for boys to wear dresses as babies and toddlers. Petticoating was never about dressing the boy as a girl, it was about returning him to the status of a baby or toddler. If a boy continued to act up he would find himself petticoated for extend period of time, until mommy was satisfied that he learned to behave like a big boy and not a baby.

In modern times petticoating gets a bad rap because the idea of dressing a boy like a girl scares people because it’s foreign to them to see a boy wearing a dress. The reality is most modern girl clothes are not that feminine and making a boy wear a denim skirt or leggings while cute is hardily petticoating and have you seen what most boys wear, long loose shorts that are pretty much culottes. Remember too that up until the 1950’s it was common to dress boys in lord Fauntleroy suits, Eton suits and other outfits that by today’s definition are girls clothes. The most successful petticoating is when the boy is dressed in old fashion ultra-frilly dresses, petticoats, and other prissy clothing. Most modern girls would throw a fit just as bad or worse over having to wear these types of prissy clothing.

Gender roles have greatly changed over the last 40 years and will continue to evolve as females take on a larger role and hopefully led us to a complete female control society. As these changes happen girls started to dress more like boys, play sports and stop wearing traditional feminine clothing (Frilly Dresses and Petticoats). For a long time, boy’s clothes did not really change or become more feminine. This is starting to change as pink is again an acceptable color for boys, boys jeans are starting to become more feminine and its common for boys to wear earrings and have long hair. On the surface these just appear as fashion trends, the reality is society has changed and femininity in boys is starting to become acceptable and even celebrated. Look how rapidly things have changed over the last decade, there are now girls sports teams that are competing and beating boys teams, schools/clubs are now having beauty pageants for boys (where the boys dress up in feminine dresses), in some schools these are now yearly events that have replaced the old girls beauty pageants, books and movies are promoting dresses for boys, go to any pre-school on Halloween and there are just as many boys dressed as Frozen Princesses as there are girls, these are plenty of other examples including the growing acceptance of the LGBT community. I firmly believe these changes are the start of lasting revolution that will lead to petticoating becoming main stream. Who knows maybe I just dreaming, IMHO within twenty years dresses and other prissy clothing will be common place for boys while jeans and t-shirts will be consider girl clothes and rarely worn by boys.

RF

Of course you know me! I live your stance, and do see an evolution process that seems to reverse roles. And I'm all about reversed roles, (I live in one). I'm also all about equality and freedom of gender expression. I don't think I want to see everyone flip gender roles to an extreme that we loose the beauty of each gender. My preference is that your sex not determine your gender. Doing that is going to require getting rid of the idea of a dominant male ego!
Heart Dreaming of a softer more loving caring and nurturing kind of world Heart
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#4
In regards to how boys dressing as "Frozen" princesses is indicative of the growing acceptance of male femininity, there is an interesting article and photo of the actress Megan Fox and her son in a princess dress. It notes that this seems to be a trend with Hollywood mothers and links to photos of the sons of actress Charlize Theron, and singer Adele, also in dresses. I think it's remarkable how rapidly what was once nearly unthinkable has become acceptable. High profile moms who are fine with their sons being photographed in public being princesses is quite a break with the past and an indicator of future mainstream acceptance.
Link:
"their sons want to dress up like princesses"
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#5
(11-21-2016, 03:59 PM)Lssy Wrote: In regards to how boys dressing as "Frozen" princesses is indicative of the growing acceptance of male femininity, there is an interesting article and photo of the actress Megan Fox and her son in a princess dress. It notes that this seems to be a trend with Hollywood mothers and links to photos of the sons of actress Charlize Theron, and singer Adele, also in dresses. I think it's remarkable how rapidly what was once nearly unthinkable has become acceptable. High profile moms who are fine with their sons being photographed in public being princesses is quite a break with the past and an indicator of future mainstream acceptance.
Link:
"their sons want to dress up like princesses"

Lssy,

I think you are right in that something that may have been unthinkable in times gone by is now regarded as acceptable. However, whilst it probably is a gradual evolution, do Hollywood mothers really represent the mainstream public? Perhaps it has to start somewhere and with the influence of celebrities it may make a substantial shift in attitudes. It will be interesting to see whether any of these boys are wearing normal dresses/skirts in a few years time.


On a slight aside, I think the wearing of "Frozen" princess dresses are almost classed as costumes. Much easier for society to accept feminine wear when it is part of fantasy role play than if it was just day to day clothing....
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#6
Sissy Matthew
Hello, 
I'm sorry I didn't mean to imply that Hollywood moms are typical of the mainstream, but only that it was an example of the changes that Radical Feminist wrote about, that high profile public figures have no problem with their son's dressing in feminine attire. Celebrities tend to generate public debate/discussion and bring issues to the forefront that ordinary persons without the media coverage cannot do as easily or widely. 
It is definitely true that wearing a costume is more acceptable than ordinary attire, but of course costumes, or specifically "Disney princess" costumes have been around since the '40s, yet have never before been accepted for boys to wear. At least as far as I know. So that seems to be a new trend that may have implications for the future. 
Here is a non-Hollywood, mainstream family that  also encourages their twin sons' love of princess dresses:
http://www.lifedeathprizes.com/videos/am...-parenting
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#7
(11-21-2016, 06:44 PM)Lssy Wrote: Sissy Matthew
Hello, 
I'm sorry I didn't mean to imply that Hollywood moms are typical of the mainstream, but only that it was an example of the changes that Radical Feminist wrote about, that high profile public figures have no problem with their son's dressing in feminine attire. Celebrities tend to generate public debate/discussion and bring issues to the forefront that ordinary persons without the media coverage cannot do as easily or widely. 
It is definitely true that wearing a costume is more acceptable than ordinary attire, but of course costumes, or specifically "Disney princess" costumes have been around since the '40s, yet have never before been accepted for boys to wear. At least as far as I know. So that seems to be a new trend that may have implications for the future. 
Here is a non-Hollywood, mainstream family that  also encourages their twin sons' love of princess dresses:
http://www.lifedeathprizes.com/videos/am...-parenting

Lssy,

I don't disagree with you and apologies if it looked like I was. I definitely think things have moved on I was just saying that sometimes it looks like things are better than they are actually are. Whilst it's  great that celebrity (and ordinary mums) encourage feminine attire in their younger sons, it's still not the norm every day.  Smile
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#8
(11-21-2016, 06:54 PM)Sissy Matthew Wrote:
(11-21-2016, 06:44 PM)Lssy Wrote: Sissy Matthew
Hello, 
I'm sorry I didn't mean to imply that Hollywood moms are typical of the mainstream, but only that it was an example of the changes that Radical Feminist wrote about, that high profile public figures have no problem with their son's dressing in feminine attire. Celebrities tend to generate public debate/discussion and bring issues to the forefront that ordinary persons without the media coverage cannot do as easily or widely. 
It is definitely true that wearing a costume is more acceptable than ordinary attire, but of course costumes, or specifically "Disney princess" costumes have been around since the '40s, yet have never before been accepted for boys to wear. At least as far as I know. So that seems to be a new trend that may have implications for the future. 
Here is a non-Hollywood, mainstream family that  also encourages their twin sons' love of princess dresses:
http://www.lifedeathprizes.com/videos/am...l-parentin
Lssy,

I don't disagree with you and apologies if it looked like I was. I definitely think things have moved on I was just saying that sometimes it looks like things are better than they are actually are. Whilst it's  great that celebrity (and ordinary mums) encourage feminine attire in their younger sons, it's still not the norm every day.  Smile

I think we maybe looking at two more generations before we can consider the feminine expression of boys to be normal or common place. Being a grand parent though I can say there is a concious horizon off it. Especially in my granddaughters.
Heart Dreaming of a softer more loving caring and nurturing kind of world Heart
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#9
Thanks everyone for the comments and points of view. Things have changed in a positive way especially for women in the western culture. We must never forget the long and challenging road ahead. None of this is going to happen overnight. The reality is things that once seem impossible are now a reality. It took me a long time to accept that certain people women and men will resist change no matter what. We are never going to convince these people that petticoating is beneficial. Instead by focusing on the younger generation we ensure they never learn the old sexist views of gender roles and more open to being gender fluid. While, I want a full blown gender reversed society and believe equality is a myth and one gender has to be the dominate while the other is submissive, that never going to happen tomorrow, instead it going to take hard work and gender fluid/transgenderism is a stepping stone to the end goal.
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#10
I do believe males (boys and men) should be able to wear dresses and skirts. My mom started me wearing dresses in 1961 and today it is not unusual for me to be out in a skirt. I have been to the malls and several discount stores like Kmart or Walmart and was accepted even though you could easily tell I am a male. Some ladies even commented on my wearing them in a positive light. Mothers should get their sons skirts for summer wear like girls along with shorts and T-shirts.
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