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why are we this way?
#11
(09-24-2020, 04:42 PM)Girlygirl Wrote: I think we would be amazed if we could find out just how frequent that disposition is, candygurl. Certainly in retrospect I have come of the opinion that it was the stigma and the pressure to conform to social norms that prevented me from becoming the person I am today before I did and I suspect it to be true of many more genetic males out there.

What a wonderful post  Heart
Read my story here: Part one, two
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#12
(09-24-2020, 04:42 PM)Girlygirl Wrote: I think we would be amazed if we could find out just how frequent that disposition is, candygurl. Certainly in retrospect I have come of the opinion that it was the stigma and the pressure to conform to social norms that prevented me from becoming the person I am today before I did and I suspect it to be true of many more genetic males out there.

That certainly applies in my case as well. Eventually the strain broke me mentally and physically and on the third attempt I accepted that future health and continued denial wouldn't work. So Natasha was let out and is now me 24/7 including work.
The ever increasing volume of young people who identify as the other sex is growing steadily and in the UK at least MtF and FtM are pretty evenly split not that you'd know that from the mass media.
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#13
I am glad you have felt able to make this decision to benefit yourself. I know from my own experiences that it isn’t an easy life choice to make - though in my case it wasn’t so much a decision as a necessity in the beginning due to the introduction of ‘full time petticoating’.
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#14
(10-09-2020, 04:38 PM)Girlygirl Wrote: I am glad you have felt able to make this decision to benefit yourself. I know from my own experiences that it isn’t an easy life choice to make - though in my case it wasn’t so much a decision as a necessity in the beginning due to the introduction of ‘full time petticoating’.

Thank You for that Girlygirl. It took me long enough but in the end, just like you, I had to accept it was necessary for me too. My early experiences certainly helped when I did finally realise, did it benefit you as well?
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#15
Whilst I wasn’t appreciative of my petticoating at the time, in retrospect I have come to realise the power of good that it has done me in making me who I am and providing me with the values I have today - so much so that I am now a strong advocate for petticoating generally. 

Although the pressures of society were such as a child that I never came close to admitting it, I think the desire to explore my femininity and leave behind the responsibilities expected of me as a male was always there and when I was petticoated full time from my 18th birthday (essentially forced to crossdress full time) I found myself in a situation for the first time where there was no longer any point trying to maintain a male persona. Previously, the punishment nature of the regime meant that I found myself riding these out before returning to my male life and the ‘street cred’ that went with it. For the first time I had the chance to leave that behind and as an air stewardess today, I can say that I’ve never made a better decision.
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#16
Interesting that we both moved on and made positive use of our experiences.
This may spark somebody's thoughts;
I've just had a very rare telephone conversation with the older of my two sisters, as usual it was something she wanted from me so we traded. One of her four boys started to cross-dress when younger and is now in a happy same-sex relationship in their flat close by. When that happened she went through the family archive (she's the current family historian). The family custom is to write a letter every ten years about your life at that point, as they won't be unsealed until at least 10 years after their death we've been pretty open in them. The three of us gave her permission to unseal ours at the time too. In the past five generations out of nearly 600 people there were 4 who had actual same-sex relationships, one lasted 35 years 10 years longer than his marriage. In our little sub-group it's two out of eleven, the next level is four out of twenty as of 11 years ago.
Those four go straight back to my Mum and my Aunt (Carol's mum. Carol being the other one). When their eight children were born they were under the same Doctor. Myself and Carol are in the process of getting our parent's medical records to see if anything happened in the timeframe 1959 to 1967 that may explain this.
All that is a detailed explanation of - There may be a medical/physical factor that causes children to express atypical characteristics. I don't think it means we are made to be Sissies but it could trigger a predisposition which would be too weak to trigger normally.
It could be one example of a much wider issue. In the UK at least the number of single-occupancy homes is ballooning, life-long partnerships are becoming rarer, and in certain sections of the population the birth rate is falling. I believe that getting to the bottom of one of these will explain the rest. I doubt it's to do with increased coffee drinking as I've read more than once.
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#17
That’s an interesting observation, Natasha and as you say, there are sissy trends (for want of a better phrase) that do seem to be becoming stronger and more prevalent in our society (which, in an aim of avoiding a repeat of the carnage unleashed on the world in the 20th Century is no bad thing in my opinion). 

It will be interesting to learn what more you uncover.
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#18
Gina,
In my case I think it was part genetic and part environmental. I was raised in a family of an attractive mother and two older very pretty sisters. All were girly girls. I was told I was the prettiest baby and often heard growing up I was too pretty to be a boy. I had very nice hair and my mother preferred I keep it long. This didn't help matters as I have always been short and thin. I grew up being told what to do by my sisters and mother and then later accepted it when other girls told me what to do. Girls were not attracted to me because I was masculine but because I was effeminate. Some were sweet and just curious and others were the assertive type. I became submissive and easily manipulated. Girls always seem curious how I would look dressed as a girl and coax me into letting them experiment. I can always tell when its heading that way. I used to resist it at first, but learned to just accept it. Usually though, after the initial curiosity or thrill wears off for them, they move on. I've learned to accept that too.
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#19
Hi Michaela,
Thank you for sharing! I had a very similar upbringing and experience. I also had girls that were attracted to me calling me cute and sweet. I believe they liked me because I always was a good listener and tried to give good advice. I would always share with the girls what the guys were saying when girls weren’t around- like their mole. But I would also be easily manipulated which sometimes got me into trouble always being the messenger. While I thought some of the girls I was friends with were attractive, I never would indicate it and even would blush at the sight of an exposed bra strap. It was the role I took on.
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