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When boys wore dresses
#1
From around 1835 to just about the start of world war II boys did in fact wear dresses.  The big department stores like Sears or Macy's offered catalogs for these.  Mothers could order dresses that were made for their sons.  Some were fancy some plain.  Unlike what is depicted on the TV, boys out west and the midwest wore them regularly, some or most schools know this is true.  Some of these dresses also came with ribbons for the boys hair since haircuts were few and far between.
Look at the attached picture here, unlike what his.clo says these were for older boys as well.  His.clo says mothers only bought them for their toddler sons - that is false.  Research this topic and click on the images logo on your search engines.


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#2
Yes melodie, there is a lot of misconceptions about petticoating and dresses for boys. From our modern eyes it looks funny and strange to see boys wearing dresses and having long feminine hair styles. All boys wore dresses at some point back in the 18th thru early 20th century. As you noted this was not only young baby/toddler age boys, many older boys wore dresses until they were teenagers sometimes even longer. This was very popular in richer families were the mother had free time and control over her sons, the father would focus his time on the older one to two sons leaving the rest for the mother to worry about. I know of some cases of petticoating were the oldest boy could not measure up or was not man enough for the father, so the father would select a younger son to become his heir leaving the older boy to be petticoated by the mother with instructions to ensure no one would ever know the older boy was male. In poorer families petticoating was more about economics, mothers would dress daughter and sons alike with hand me down dresses for as long as possible.

IMHO, we are long overdue for dresses for boys to become in fashion again, this will happen someday and they will be very popular as mothers will see how cute their sons look and before long be styling their hair in more feminine fashions again.
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#3
Did boys who were petticoated in olden days have to wear panties under their dresses?

Whenever I got put into a dress or skirt I always had to wear knickers as well.
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#4
Yes of course proper feminine undergarments were always worn, including corsets, in fact corsets for boys were common even when they wore trousers.
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#5
(09-04-2016, 07:43 PM)RadicalFeminist Wrote: Yes melodie, there is a lot of misconceptions about petticoating and dresses for boys. From our modern eyes it looks funny and strange to see boys wearing dresses and having long feminine hair styles. All boys wore dresses at some point back in the 18th thru early 20th century. As you noted this was not only young baby/toddler age boys, many older boys wore dresses until they were teenagers sometimes even longer. This was very popular in richer families were the mother had free time and control over her sons, the father would focus his time on the older one to two sons leaving the rest for the mother to worry about. I know of some cases of petticoating were the oldest boy could not measure up or was not man enough for the father, so the father would select a younger son to become his heir leaving the older boy to be petticoated by the mother with instructions to ensure no one would ever know the older boy was male. In poorer families petticoating was more about economics, mothers would dress daughter and sons alike with hand me down dresses for as long as possible.

IMHO, we are long overdue for dresses for boys to become in fashion again, this will happen someday and they will be very popular as mothers will see how cute their sons look and before long be styling their hair in more feminine fashions again.

I do believe this is happening today.  Look at who is buying dresses for their sons, ie Therone, Adele, Etc.  There are other moms as well shopping at the better stores and buying their sons dresses and skirts.
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#6
It certainly is, just check out my pinterest page and the countless number of other pages dedicated to this subject. My inbox currently has several hundred new messages from mothers who are not just curious but totally committed to installing femininity into their sons. Most of this still happens behind closed doors or the boys are presented as stealth girls, things are changing don’t know when but this will become mainstream sooner than later.
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#7
Today the school administrations say that a boy wearing a dress or a skirt to school cause unwanted attention or is disruptive to the learning enviroment.  That is a lot of crap.  Boys did wear dresses and skirts to school.  It is the adults who have a problem with it.  Even in dresses or skirts boys and girls used the gender designated restrooms and learned their daily lessons.

here is further proof.


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#8
(09-04-2016, 01:53 PM)melodie Wrote: From around 1835 to just about the start of world war II boys did in fact wear dresses.  The big department stores like Sears or Macy's offered catalogs for these.  Mothers could order dresses that were made for their sons.  Some were fancy some plain.  Unlike what is depicted on the TV, boys out west and the midwest wore them regularly, some or most schools know this is true.  Some of these dresses also came with ribbons for the boys hair since haircuts were few and far between.
Look at the attached picture here, unlike what his.clo says these were for older boys as well.  His.clo says mothers only bought them for their toddler sons - that is false.  Research this topic and click on the images logo on your search engines.

Melodie, I am from Bulgaria. We also have this tradition. Bulgaria was occupied by Turkey since 1393 till 1878. There were a lot of various heavy taxes imposed on the enslaved Bulgarian. The cruelest of them was the "blood tax". Every year Turkish government representatives visited every Bulgarian settlement, accompanied by soldiers, and took with them a boy aged 12-15 from each family. They led these boys to Istanbul, converted them to islam and trained them as janissaries. After years of brain-washing and military and religious training, these boys used to forget their Bulgarian origins and relatives and become sultan's most faithful guard. In order to save their male children from the blood tax, Bulgarians developed a tradition to dress boys as girls up to the age of 17-18. These tradition existed till the early 1900s.
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#9
Whenever I was put into a dress female undergarments went on first. I think it would feel funny to have it any other way.
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#10
Author Robert Louis Stevenson (Treasure Island, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), born 1850
[Image: Robert_Louis_Stevenson_daguerreotype_por..._child.jpg]
Author Ernest Hemingway (A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls), born 1899
[Image: e2ee74f537db4529e18689fbd332b0b3.jpg]
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