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Founding Mothers
#1
I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."
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#2
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

Ever so intriguing!  Who would have thought Cokie would write something like this?  I'll have to read Founding Mothers myself.
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#3
(02-14-2017, 07:16 PM)mikki Wrote:
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

Ever so intriguing!  Who would have thought Cokie would write something like this?  I'll have to read Founding Mothers myself.

This was assigned reading for my daughter years ago and I enjoyed it too, a light read, has recipes too.  Inspiring to read about the roles we played in founding our nation, but really looking forward to a country where more of us are in charge.
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#4
(05-26-2017, 03:39 PM)Jennica Wrote:
(02-14-2017, 07:16 PM)mikki Wrote:
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

Ever so intriguing!  Who would have thought Cokie would write something like this?  I'll have to read Founding Mothers myself.

This was assigned reading for my daughter years ago and I enjoyed it too, a light read, has recipes too.  Inspiring to read about the roles we played in founding our nation, but really looking forward to a country where more of us are in charge.

Well need to pick this one up. Yes mothers in the 18th and 19th century were full blown supporters of petticoating. Of course back than petticoating was more about returning a bratty boy back to toddler hood. Since all children boys and girls a like wore dresses to 4 or 5 years old. It was common place for older boys especially in more richer families to be kept in frocks well past the age of breaching even up to adulthood. Back then make mothers had complete control over their children and how they were dressed and behaved. Modern society would benefit from mothers having this level of control again and of course using petticoating on all brats.
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#5
(05-29-2017, 07:09 AM)RadicalFeminist Wrote:
(05-26-2017, 03:39 PM)Jennica Wrote:
(02-14-2017, 07:16 PM)mikki Wrote:
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

Ever so intriguing!  Who would have thought Cokie would write something like this?  I'll have to read Founding Mothers myself.

This was assigned reading for my daughter years ago and I enjoyed it too, a light read, has recipes too.  Inspiring to read about the roles we played in founding our nation, but really looking forward to a country where more of us are in charge.

Well need to pick this one up. Yes mothers in the 18th and 19th century were full blown supporters of petticoating. Of course back than petticoating was more about returning a bratty boy back to toddler hood. Since all children boys and girls a like wore dresses to 4 or 5 years old. It was common place for older boys especially in more richer families to be kept in frocks well past the age of breaching even up to adulthood. Back then make mothers had complete control over their children and how they were dressed and behaved. Modern society would benefit from mothers having this level of control again and of course using petticoating on all brats.

This is where I think a lot of the idea of using diapers together with the frocks came from--if you can't show you can act like you're grown, then we'll dress you back in the infantile attire!

Kind of makes me wonder how many mothers go that route with their brats when they decide to petticoat these days. RadicalFeminist, do you get many mothers reverting their brats back to diapers, even if only for a while?
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#6
I like to think of all the Women here on the forum and at PDQ as pioneers and Founding Mothers, if you will, and especially Auntie Helga.  The Petticoat Discipline Quarterly had a great impact on me, forcing me to think about myself honestly and accept my true nature and my natural role in the great scheme of things.  For example, it was first a consolation and then a source of pride reading of other sissies during critical times ranging from trashing all of my inappropriate male underwear, through my first diapering and to my current acceptance of my very own chastity cage (five months now!).  Thank you all for leading me to where I've always wanted to be. 
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#7
(05-29-2017, 07:56 PM)Sissy Renee Wrote: I like to think of all the Women here on the forum and at PDQ as pioneers and Founding Mothers, if you will, and especially Auntie Helga.  The Petticoat Discipline Quarterly had a great impact on me, forcing me to think about myself honestly and accept my true nature and my natural role in the great scheme of things.  For example, it was first a consolation and then a source of pride reading of other sissies during critical times ranging from trashing all of my inappropriate male underwear, through my first diapering and to my current acceptance of my very own chastity cage (five months now!).  Thank you all for leading me to where I've always wanted to be. 

What a wonderfully lovely sentiment Renee. While there have been some men who have influenced my life, I am absolutely grateful to a long list of strong women, who as you said, have been "leading me where I've always wanted to be". Nurturing and encouraging my natural feminine tendencies to come forward, and fully blossom. I have been so blessed that my mother instilled in me a sense of pride - whether it be appearance or my chores - to be the best sissy I can be. I have always turned to women to help me make decisions, whether personally or professionally. I can always point to a woman as the impetus behind every major decision I have made. Always holding my hand, both literally and figuratively helping me realize my sissy potential. 
So thank you Auntie Helga, for being one of the strong and influential women who helped "found" me - I will always do my best to be as feminine and submissive to you and all the women in my life, that have made me what I am. A true and proud sissy. An extra low curtsy to you Auntie Heart
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#8
(05-29-2017, 06:16 PM)Richardto Wrote:
(05-29-2017, 07:09 AM)RadicalFeminist Wrote:
(05-26-2017, 03:39 PM)Jennica Wrote:
(02-14-2017, 07:16 PM)mikki Wrote:
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

Ever so intriguing!  Who would have thought Cokie would write something like this?  I'll have to read Founding Mothers myself.

This was assigned reading for my daughter years ago and I enjoyed it too, a light read, has recipes too.  Inspiring to read about the roles we played in founding our nation, but really looking forward to a country where more of us are in charge.

Well need to pick this one up. Yes mothers in the 18th and 19th century were full blown supporters of petticoating. Of course back than petticoating was more about returning a bratty boy back to toddler hood. Since all children boys and girls a like wore dresses to 4 or 5 years old. It was common place for older boys especially in more richer families to be kept in frocks well past the age of breaching even up to adulthood. Back then make mothers had complete control over their children and how they were dressed and behaved. Modern society would benefit from mothers having this level of control again and of course using petticoating on all brats.

This is where I think a lot of the idea of using diapers together with the frocks came from--if you can't show you can act like you're grown, then we'll dress you back in the infantile attire!

Kind of makes me wonder how many mothers go that route with their brats when they decide to petticoat these days. RadicalFeminist, do you get many mothers reverting their brats back to diapers, even if only for a while?

Yes some mothers have returned their brats to diapers, usually only used as a punishment or threat. While not very common, I do know a few that revert their princesses back to needing potting training. I would not recommend this unless the brat was super aggressive and the mother was willing to deal with changing diapers on a older brat.

RF
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#9
I am not surprised that it isn't a big thing, I know a lot of parents are ecstatic when they finally get children out of diapers and no longer have to do so many changes through the day. At the same time, I have heard some mothers lamenting how they can't stand how their kids act and they literally want to start over with them, regardless of whether it means going back to changing diapers all the time.
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#10
(02-13-2017, 04:04 PM)GinaV Wrote: I just started reading Cokie Roberts' Founding Mothers and it is a joy to read. I hope to do a review of the book when I am finished, but feel as if I must take notes as I read for it is rich with imagery and stories of the Women who inhabited "the domestic sphere" as it was called in the eighteenth century. I'm only up to page 17 and already have read about three incredible Women's really incredible and impressive lives. But I laughed out loud when I read what one of them wrote in a letter to a friend: "Billy Vance is going to be married- did you ever hear the like? Pray what can he do with a wife? He is more of a Woman than a man.," and "Mr. Spencer is under petticoat government, that is certain."

I have seen the phrase "under Petticoat Government" used in several historical letters and books where they are describing a weak man whose wife rules him.  Then it was something to be sneered at and made fun of, but today many males could easily be described that way.
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